It’s Time To Shield Your Portfolio: A Message From Seeking Alpha’s Founder

There are reasons to fear a significant market correction. Coronavirus is one of them, but not the only one. Your biggest challenge as an investor is to resist acting on your emotions. Most investors fail at market timing. So don’t “sell everything”, thinking you’ll be able to time your re-entry. In a correction, weak stocks will fall further and bounce less in the subsequent recovery than good stocks. Make sure you own good stocks. This article describes a simple but powerful tool that everyone can use to check the quality and health of the stocks they own. Use it now for free, before the market falls further. We are in a time of great uncertainty. Following President Trump’s press conference about the coronavirus, the markets are down once again. We’ve now seen multiple days of sharp declines as investors have started to appreciate the seriousness of the coronavirus outbreak. If the right measures are taken, casualties from the coronavirus will be limited, and will probably be far lower than those seen from many other causes of reduced life expectancy. However, even then the economic impact of preventing the spread of the virus could be substantial. The...

The Thunderstorm Whisperers: A History of Lightning Rods

Benjamin Franklin was attracted to electricity. Given its similar color, crackle, and configuration, he suspected that lightning itself was electricity. Noting that a pointed metal needle could draw electricity from a charged metal sphere, Franklin became convinced that a metal rod could coax lightning from the sky. Why? So it would strike the rod instead of buildings or passersby. As legend has it, Franklin hopped on a horse in 1752 with key-adorned kite in hand, determined to prove his conviction. The two pranced about under stormy skies until the charged-filled atmosphere energized the key and confirmed his suspicions. More than two-and-a-half centuries later, lighting rods persist—as decorative architectural pieces, as vestiges of the past, and as mitigators of lightning’s power. Franklin later extended his lightning-rod idea to ships, including British warships, which were eventually outfitted with anchor chains that stretched from the top of their wooden masts to the sea. They aimed to dissipate electrical energy so the masts would stay intact if lightning struck. Soon, lightning rods were widely adopted in the northeastern United States, and elsewhere during the mid-1700s...

Why This Mortgage REIT’s No-Debt Rule Changes the Game

<!–*/ */ /*–>*/ There’s often a lot of uncertainty involved when buying a company that has just recently gone public. But sometimes it is worth the risk. That appears to be true for mortgage real estate investment trust (REIT) Broadmark Realty Capital (NYSE: BRMK). The reason for this optimism? Broadmark isn’t your typical mortgage REIT. Here’s what you need to know about this recent IPO, and why you might want to buy it before Wall Street catches on. The first thing to understand about Broadmark is that it deals in debt that is tied to property, but not mortgages as you know them. When most homeowners get a mortgage, a bank is basically fronting them the money to buy a home. The new homeowner agrees to pay back the loan, with interest, over time. The bank (or other company that originates the mortgage) often puts together a whole bunch of loans that it owns and sells them as a single batch to investors, which often include real estate investment trusts that specialize in owning these “collateralized” mortgages.  These mortgage REITs typically sell stock and, notably, borrow money to buy mortgage securities. They make their money t...

Science-fiction pioneer Robert A. Heinlein was an author, aeronautical engineer, and retired Naval officer who coined

Science-fiction pioneer Robert A. Heinlein was an author, aeronautical engineer, and retired Naval officer who coined the term “grok,” which is defined, in part, as “to understand intuitively,” where “intuit” is “a quick and ready insight.” This is an important matriculation of the term “understanding” when it comes to Moore’s law because, while many people are quick to spew-off their well-rehearsed, superficial understanding of Gordon Moore’s transistor doubling observation that we’ve all come to know and love, they don’t grok it in that they could tell you what Intel (INTC) meant when they critiqued AMD (AMD) for “gluing chips together” instead of making a proper single-chip CPU. Moore’s law is the observation that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles about every two years. I’ve been toying with this article for too long – first rejected by Seeking Alpha for being “in the weeds” and then becoming way too verbose for my own taste. For the sake of brevity, I need to get to the point. Moore’s law seems simple if we just su...

Kids not only say the darndest things, but when they speak as one, they get things

Kids not only say the darndest things, but when they speak as one, they get things done. Ask Alfred C. Carosi. Carosi is a corporate vice president of marketing services with Hasbro, a toy company. Hasbro happens to be the creator of Transformers, a popular children’s program featuring a range of robots as heroes and villians. They’re called autobots. Hasbro, in an effort to revamp its toy line pertaining to Transformers, used its feature-length film of the same name to kill off Optimus Prime, leader of the good guys on the TV series. The philosphy of Hasbro in terms of toy product is to turn its entire line every two years and introduce new toys. The company thought the feature film a good place to kill off Optimus Prime and give a reason for his disapearance from the toy line. “There was immediate reaction,” says Carosi. “We got a lot of phone calls and letters from kids. We were frankly surprised at the number of letters. When we killed off Optimus Prime, I thought they might be a little bit upset, but we had new heroes for them in the movie. That didn’t seem to matter.” So for the first time, Hasbro brought back a series figure. Opti...

Three national laboratories achieve record magnetic field for accelerator focusing magnet

In a multiyear effort involving three national laboratories from across the United States, researchers have successfully built and tested a powerful new magnet based on an advanced superconducting material. The eight-ton device — about as long as a semi-truck trailer — set a record for the highest field strength ever recorded for an accelerator focusing magnet and raises the standard for magnets operating in high-energy particle colliders. The Department of Energy’s Fermilab, Brookhaven National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory designed, built and tested the new magnet, one of 16 they will provide for operation in the  High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider at CERN laboratory in Europe. The 16 magnets, along with another eight produced by CERN, serve as “optics” for charged particles: They will focus beams of protons into a tiny, infinitesimal spot as they approach collision inside two different particle detectors. The ingredient that sets these U.S.-produced magnets apart is niobium-tin – a superconducting material that produces strong magnetic fields. These will be the first niobium-tin quadrupole magnets ever to operate in a particle accelerator. “This acco...

Located in the Shoppes of Avondale, three blocks from the river and just a quick walk

Located in the Shoppes of Avondale, three blocks from the river and just a quick walk from restaurants like Biscottis and Orsay, Emory Clothing made its debut this spring. Owner Lauren E. Meek, a Jacksonville native, dresses local women for everything from the office to happy hour in casual-but-cool brands like Xirena, Velvet, Joie and Emerson Fry. The boutique space incorporates dark concrete floors to contrast white walls with seasonally rotated art from Caleb Mahoney. Inventory isn’t limited to daily wear—like the jeans from Citizens of Humanity or J Brand that will last for years—as Meek also carries cocktail and wedding attire from La Maison Talulah, Parker, Caballero and Capulet, as well as designer jewelry and bags from Jenny Bird and Clare V. “I wanted to have a little bit of everything and be a one-stop shop for people,” Meek says. emoryclothing.com Meant to be just a six-month pop-up, Odd Birds Bar served its first libations four years ago in St. Augustine, right in front of the historic landmark Castillo de San Marcos. It quickly became a local favorite and permanent drinking hole, so in the spring, co-owners Shane McFarland, Asdrubal Martinez and Cesar Diaz opened an...

The Greenlee Cable Stripping Tool doesn’t have an exposed blade, so it gets the job done

The Greenlee Cable Stripping Tool doesn’t have an exposed blade, so it gets the job done safely. But that safety comes with a slight trade-off. Veteran Pros adept at stripping a cable with a blade probably won’t have the patience to use it if it isn’t required. However, it’s a great option for jobs where an exposed blade or razor is prohibited. That’s more common than you may realize. SUPPORT OUR ADVERTISERSgoogletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display(‘div-gpt-ad-1389975325257-0′); }); You’ve probably seen designs similar to the Greenlee Adjustable Cable Stripping Tool for small diameter wire applications like VDV. Greenlee has supersized the style for diameters up to 750kcmil (750MCM) for the purpose of reducing exposed blade lacerations. Forty percent of recordable job site injuries are exposed blade lacerations, so it’s hard to argue against the notion. To use the tool, you first set the blade depth so it scores the jacket but not the wire. This really only needs to happen once, however for each thickness of jacket you intend to strip. For the most part, this step won’t be required. You then squeeze the Greenlee cable stripping tool to open it up and insert ...