Much of the new United States–Mexico–Canada Agreement (USMCA) remains consistent with NAFTA, but improvements include chapters on digital trade, intellectual property protection, and cross-border data flows. Digital trade of goods and services, as well as the need to protect intellectual property, has increased dramatically. The 1994 NAFTA did not have common rules for the U.S., Mexico, and Canada to address these new modes of trade. The USMCA falls short in several key areas, including on labor, environment, government procurement, and rules of origin. In May 2017, the Trump Administration began the process of renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The original NAFTA, which came into force in 1994, created one of the largest and most successful trade zones in the world by expanding freer trade among the agreement’s three signatories. Following more than a year of renegotiations, the leaders of the United States, Mexico, and Canada gathered in Buenos Aires on November 30, 2018, to sign the new agreement, called the United States–Mexico–Canada Agreement (USMCA). The next step for Congress and the Trump Administration is to develop implementing legislation ...