Welcome back to Period Dramas, a weekly column that alternates between rounding up historic homes on

Welcome back to Period Dramas, a weekly column that alternates between rounding up historic homes on the market and answering questions we’ve always had about older structures. Last summer, we took a day trip to check out an early 19th-century Federal house that was on the market about an hour and a half north of New York City. The house had essentially sat vacant for a few decades and was previously inhabited by somebody who did very little work on the house. In short: Very little had changed since it was completed in about 1830. It needed an alarming amount of work. We immediately noticed the house’s plaster walls and molding. We began to think about the wide spectrum of places we’ve seen plaster detailing—from social clubs’ stately drawing rooms to picture molding in our own (modest) apartments. And now here we were, about a hundred miles north of New York City, confronting a similar type of construction. “In the 19th and early 20th centuries, the plaster industry was thriving,” says Foster Reeve, founder of Foster Reeve & Associates, an architectural and ornamental plaster company. “That was how you built. You didn’t have the dimensional lumber that you have today. Ther...

Dollhouse mania: Miniature shop moves to New Bedford mill – News – southcoasttoday.com

NEW BEDFORD — Nathaniel Ellis’ childhood dreams — and those of dollhouse fans across New England — just got a little bigger. And that’s saying a lot when you dream in one-twelfth scale. Ellis, an interior designer for real-life homes, quietly opened a 3,000-square-foot dollhouse shop in New Bedford over the weekend. Flip This Dollhouse celebrates its grand opening Saturday, March 2. “I decided to start selling it so I could keep collecting, because for me, it was always about the thrill of the hunt,” said Ellis, 34. Dollhouse fans within a few hours’ drive may be familiar with his jam-packed booths at the New Bedford Antiques Center on Wamsutta Street, slated close at the end of March. When the closing was announced, he decided to take his armloads of miniature desks and clawfoot tubs and tiny vases, along with some 40 vintage and handmade dollhouses, to a “go big” space in the former Kilburn Mill. Now, with six times the space, he displays everything separately instead of packing accessories into the houses. So, if you’re in the market for a pedestal sink, you can eyeball the rows like you’re in a miniaturized architectural...