‘Shark Tank’: The 10 Most Popular Products Ever Featured on the Show

Investors aka sharks, on ABC’s competition series Shark Tank, where entrepreneurs pitch their product or service in the hopes of securing an investment, have seen a lot — and we mean a lot — of stuff enter the tank in 11 seasons (go behind-the-scenes of the current season here). Ahead, learn which products seen on Shark Tank have become best sellers.  USA Today used figures from Sony Pictures, the producer of the show, to compile a list of the 20 best-selling products on Shark Tank. See the top 10 most popular items below.  In a 2014 episode of Shark Tank, co-founders of the sock brand, Bombas, received an offer of $200,000 for a 17% stake in the business from shark, Daymond John. For every pair of socks sold, the company donates a pair. And today, Bombas has made $225 million in sales. That’s a lot of donated socks. A kitchen sponge made big money for shark, Lori Greiner, in 2012 when she offered Scrub Daddy $200,000 for a 20% stake in the company. Now, Scrub Daddy’s sales total $209 million. Just two years after investing in the product, Greiner called her decision to back Scrub Daddy one of the “best investments” she’s ever made on Shark Tank, according to CNBC.  A bathroom s...

Here’s the scenario: You have a bunch of vegetables and aren’t sure what to do with

Here’s the scenario: You have a bunch of vegetables and aren’t sure what to do with them. You don’t have the energy or brain space to make anything remotely complicated. This is what you do: Just roast them to hit that sweet spot. It’s an easy method, and you’ll get lightly browned, crispy-skinned vegetables with tender, honeyed flesh within. Raw vegetables can taste bitter, especially to people who aren’t totally sold on eating them (such as kids or grown-up kids). Roasting vegetables mellows the flavor, says registered dietician Susan Bowerman on Discover Good Nutrition. She’s the director of nutrition training at weight-management company Herbalife and a board-certified specialist in sports dietetics. “Roasting is one of my favorite ways to cook vegetables—especially carrots, cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts,” Bowerman says. “The dry heat of the oven caramelizes the natural sugars in vegetables, which brings about an amazing depth of flavor. And, it’s super easy.” Dry-heat cooking, either by roasting or frying, helps release the natural sugars in vegetables. This caramelization is a non-enzymic browning reaction that happens when there is no water and sugars break ...

A Tough Task for FTC: Regulating Instagram When Anyone Can Be an Influencer menu close Asset 6 Facebook1 twitter1 linkedin1 Email SVG Share Icon arrow1 arrow1 twitter1 Facebook1 linkedin1 Email SVG Share Icon twitter1 Email SVG Share Icon Facebook1 twitter1 linkedin1 Email SVG Share Icon

39% of Instagram users said they were comfortable with accounts on the platform posting ads on their profiles, while 35% said they were not comfortable with the idea. Roughly one-third said a sample of influencer posts clearly labeled or showcasing a product were not advertisements or that they were unsure or had no opinion. When Netflix Inc. and Hulu released documentaries in January detailing the fraud behind the Fyre Festival — which was propelled by glowing posts on Instagram from famous people like Kendall Jenner, Emily Ratajkowski and Bella Hadid — viewers were outraged by the deception created from posts that lacked details about financial motives. That outrage, however, hasn’t made its way to Washington, where lawmakers and regulators are instead focusing on issues of data privacy, robocalls and competition. Even though major consumer advocacy groups such as Truth in Advertising have pressed the Federal Trade Commission to crack down on what they see as deceptive advertising, they say that the agency’s lack of adequate resources and rule-making authority, as well as Instagram’s ability to blend sponsored posts seamlessly with regular posts, make it difficult to regulate ...