20 health and medtech start-ups with their finger on the pulse

‘It’s not about the technology – it’s about the problems it solves in the world’ With a strong showing from Ireland, we’ve compiled a list of 20 top European start-ups tackling health issues. With so much research in life sciences creating viable commercial opportunities, new health, medtech and biotech start-ups are exploding on the scene. In Ireland, Galway in particular has emerged as a hotbed of start-up activity in these sectors, and we’ve spotted even more start-ups to watch in this space across Europe in 2020 and beyond. NUI Galway spin-out Atrian Medical arose from a licensing agreement with the Mayo Clinic followed by four years’ development of a treatment for atrial fibrillation (AFib), an irregular heart rate that can increase the risk of other complications. Atrian’s technology selectively targets clusters of cells responsible for AFib with short pulses of electrical energy delivered without damaging the heart muscle. Back from left: Barry O’Brien, Atrian Medical; Jonathon Kavanagh, WDC; Ken Coffey, Atrian Medical; Alan Hobbs, Enterprise Ireland; Declan Quinn, Xenium Capital. Front: John Reilly, Atrian Medical; and Eimear Gleeseon, Atlantic Bridge....

Been feeling bloated… and sluggish… with a foggy brain and middle school-level breakouts? Let’s say you’ve

Been feeling bloated… and sluggish… with a foggy brain and middle school-level breakouts? Let’s say you’ve been getting enough sleep and exercise and you know your mental health is in check. So what in deep hell is going on with your body? That’s when a sponsored Instagram naturopath might suggest it’s food-related. Facebook then says, “Hey, why not try a food sensitivity test?” And you think, “Sounds solid…right?” But before you order that test kit in the hope of finding a quick answer, there’s something you should know about the fine print. These kits remain controversial within the medical and nutrition communities, and their terms are often poorly defined. The guidelines around what “counts” as a food allergy are well-established, and true allergic reactions can be documented via tests of your blood or skin. A genuine food allergy happens when your immune system treats a specific food as an invader. So when someone who’s allergic to tree nuts accidentally gets almond milk in their coffee, they’re likely to break out in hives, vomit, itch, or even go into anaphylactic shock. The results can get gnarly, making this definition pretty clear-cut. And food intolerances? We know a ...